How to Turn Off Your Water Heater — and When It May Come Up

How to Turn Off Your Water Heater — and When It May Come Up

If you notice a leak from your water heater or your water supply is cut off, it’s important to act quickly to avoid damage to your heater unit or surrounding walls and floors. Typically, this means turning off your water heater.

This May Also Interest You: Does My Homeowners Insurance Cover My Water Heater?

Knowing in advance how to turn off your water heater can give you the confidence that you know what to do in a plumbing emergency. Here’s a quick guide.

Is It OK to Turn Off a Water Heater?

It’s generally best to avoid turning your water heater off too regularly. Some homeowners try to save money by switching off their water heaters when they don’t need them, but the savings are unlikely to be significant enough to justify the additional wear and tear on your machine.

Furthermore, you’ll have to wait for around an hour for the water heater to produce enough hot water for a bath or shower after you turn it back on, which is bad news if you’re in a rush and don’t leave enough time. Switching your water heater on also puts it under extra stress, which could cause it to malfunction if you do it again and again. However, there are some situations when you’ll need to turn your water heater off.

When and Why Should You Turn Off a Water Heater?

There are a couple of situations when you should consider turning your water heater off. If your main water supply is turned off for any reason, it’s best to shut down the water heater as a precaution until the supply resumes. Continuing to run your water heater when the tank isn’t full could cause heat damage to the internal components.

The other time you should always turn off a water heater is if it starts leaking. This is a sign of a faulty valve or could indicate that your heater is simply too old and needs replacing. A water leak from your heater could cause damage to your walls or floors, so turn it off until you can get support from a professional plumber. You’ll also need to turn off an electric water heater before you flush it.

How Do I Shut Off My Gas Water Heater?

First, locate the temperature dial on your gas water heater and twist it into the off position. Look around the top of the water heater to find the supply line and switch off the valve to stop any more water from flowing into the heater.

Next, you need to switch off the gas supply to the heater. If you have a lever, turn it so that it’s perpendicular to the supply line. If you have a knob, twist it clockwise until it won’t go any further. Finally, turn the air relief valve off to let air inside the tank.

How Do I Shut Off My Electric Water Heater?

Start by finding the breaker box for your home’s electricity supply and turn off the line to your water heater. You can usually find the breaker box on an external wall. If you plan on flushing your water heater, now is a good time. Turn off the water supply valve, then switch off the air supply valve to allow the tank to fill with air.

More Related Articles:

Can I Turn Off the Water and Leave My Water Heater On?

If you need to turn your water off for any reason, it’s always safer to turn your water heater off, too. While many water heaters will be fine for a while without a water supply, reduced water pressure or a low water level inside the tank could cause the heater’s components to overheat and burn. This could cause significant, expensive damage to your water heater.

How Do I Know If My Water Heater Is Off?

If you’re concerned that you haven’t turned your water heater off correctly, try turning on a faucet for a couple of minutes to ensure that the water runs cold. You can also try listening to the heater to check that it’s silent. While a water heater should be reasonably quiet if it’s in good working order, most make a low noise that will alert you if it’s still running.

8 Shower Storage Solutions

8 Shower Storage Solutions

Having an organized shower is crucial to making your showering experience smooth and relaxing. There are many types of shower organizers, and choosing the right one depends on different factors. Apart from functionality, shower organization also affects the aesthetic of your bathroom and impacts how much space you have.

This May Also Interest You: Here’s How to Hack Your Low-Flow Showerhead … But Should You?

Since you spend a considerable amount of time each day in the shower, you want to design the area in the most effective way to save time and space. If you think shelving is the only way to get organized, you’d be wrong. There are other effective shower storage solutions that might be more convenient for you.

Can You Store Things in a Shower Without Shelving?

Shelving is often one of the most common solutions for organizing a shower. However, there are many other types of shower organization techniques that don’t require shelving. While shelving certainly has its benefits, it also takes up valuable space unless it’s already built-in. Other options can also make organizing more simple.

Organizers, Hooks, Caddies and More

Here are eight different shower storage solutions for your bathroom. Each one is suitable for different showers and organization goals, so you can choose the one that best suits your needs.

1. Built-In Shower Shelves

There are many showers out there that already have pre-existing, built-in wall shelves. These are typically large enough to hold your shampoos and soaps. In terms of space, they’re one of the most efficient solutions. Organization-wise, though, they aren’t the best, and if you have several items, it can quickly get messy or chaotic if something falls. If you’re remodeling your bathroom and getting a new shower, it’s worth considering built-in shelves if space is a big priority.

2. Corner Shelves

Corner shelves can be a great addition to a shower because you can easily store items while bringing some style to the shower. They are easy to install and can hold shower products like face wash, face scrub, razors, shaving cream and more. They don’t take up too much space, either. There are many designs for corner shelves and sizes, too. You can choose among glass, granite, ceramic and more. There are even shower caddy-style options.

3. Shower Caddies

After shelves, shower caddies are probably the second most commonly used shower organizers. Shower caddies are convenient if you live in a place where you share a shower with other people.

Michelle Hansen, a professional organizer who runs Practical Perfection, says caddies make it easy to corral all of your own items, and they don’t get mixed up with other people’s stuff. It also helps to designate a spot for all of your items so that it stays looking nice and organized.

There are many types of shower caddies, so it’s easy to find one that matches the style and size of your shower.

4. Shower Hooks

If you’re looking for ways to organize things like shower sponges or a squeegee, you can use something as simple as shower hooks. Shower hooks are a great addition to bathrooms and showers, offering a convenient way to place things to hang off the walls. By having a place for each individual item, you can keep things clutter-free.

Another way you can use shower hooks is by hooking up a laundry basket on them. Then instead of adding one item, you can fit a whole bunch of things in the laundry basket. It’s not nearly as elegant as other storage methods, but it’s certainly efficient.

More Related Articles:

5. Floating Shower Bench

Floating shower benches are growing in popularity because they add more than just storage. Convenience is another significant factor. You can place items on the bench or below the bench, knowing you won’t accidentally knock them over.

Apart from that, benches also make other things you do in the shower more manageable, like shaving your legs. It also makes for a great experience if you just want to sit and relax while the water falls on you. There are many designs available, and you can use different materials like marble, granite or quartz to match the bathroom design.

6. Soap and Shampoo Dispensers

Showers can quickly get cluttered up with shampoo, conditioner and body wash bottles. Hansen suggests you can easily get rid of that clutter and have a perfectly organized shower by using a dispenser. Plus, using a dispenser cuts down on product waste — especially when you have kids. With a dispenser, only a certain amount of each product gets released each push.

However, you should choose carefully when buying a shampoo dispenser. Some of them might have little durability and can fall off the wall after a while, causing a mess.

7. Shower Baskets

A shower basket is another simple way of organizing the shower without taking up too much space. Shower baskets can be added to the corners or right by the shower walls. You have a wide range of choices when it comes to sizes as well. Some shower baskets will come with suction cups to attach them to tiles, but others require drilling. To eliminate this need, you can use a popular solution like Sugru Moldable Glue to hold it up instead.

8. Hanging Mesh Organizer

A hanging mesh organizer connects to your shower curtain tension rod. Depending on the one you buy, it will have several pockets where you can place things like shampoo, body wash, razors and bath sponges. Since they just kind of hang from the rod, they don’t take up any additional space like other shower organizers. They’re also pretty easy to set up, so they don’t require a tricky installation.

What’s the Best Shower Organizer?

Among all the types of shower organizers, which one is the best one? Well, there’s no exact answer to that. As mentioned, each shower organizer has its pros and cons. Even better: You can use two types of shower organizers at the same time. You can have corner shelves while also using shower caddies or product dispensers.

In the end, it comes down to how you want to style your shower and the space you have available. If you just want something simple and effective and you don’t care too much about how it looks, then shower hooks or hanging mesh organizers are a perfect choice. For something more stylish, you can equip the shower with corner shelves, shower caddies or built-in shelves.

Prevent Frozen-Pipe Problems by Knowing These Things Down Cold

Prevent Frozen-Pipe Problems by Knowing These Things Down Cold

As a homeowner, you should always be on the lookout for things that can cause damage to your home — and your bank balance. One of the things you should be on the lookout for when the mercury drops is frozen pipes. A frozen waterline can, unfortunately, be all too common among homeowners and can lead to the need for thousands of dollars in repairs.

This May Also Interest You: 9 Ways To Winterize Your Home

We’ll take you through some questions you should be asking yourself, and provide helpful answers to make you aware of problems to be on the lookout for and preventive measures you can take to avoid frozen-pipe problems.

How Long Does It Take for Pipes to Freeze?

Your waterlines — especially those located outdoors — are prone to freezing during cold temperatures. There’s no definitive time it takes for pipes to freeze — but be assured that, in extremely cold weather, it won’t take very long. It may seem counterintuitive, but houses in warmer climates are usually more susceptible to frozen pipes than houses in colder climates because the latter group typically have construction measures to guard against such issues.

Insulation and where your pipes are situated are probably the biggest factors in determining how long it might take the lines to freeze.

frozen faucet drip

How Cold Does It Have to Get for Pipes to Freeze?

Many homeowners believe that, because water freezes when the air temperature reaches 32 degrees Fahrenheit that their pipes are in danger as soon as the thermometer dips to that number. Well, you may breathe a sigh of relief to learn that’s not the case.

You need to be concerned about your faucets when the weatherman forecasts temperatures of 20 degrees or less. At that point, how well-insulated your pipes are will dictate whether your pipes are sufficiently protected. With a reasonable amount of insulation, even pipes in an unheated area could take as long as six hours to freeze. On the other hand, if you have little or no insulation, your pipes could freeze in as little as three hours.

What Are the Risks of a Frozen Waterline?

Not only are frozen pipes a huge nuisance that can cause you headaches and your water systems problems, it can also cost you lots of money. When a frozen pipe bursts, which can happen if left unchecked, water damage is all but inevitable. It could cost you tens of thousands of dollars to repair the damage left behind.

That’s why it’s vital to call a professional plumber at the first sign of a frozen pipe. If a pipe does burst, it can be tempting to try to remove anything in the water’s path, but for safety’s sake it’s best to wait until help arrives, as standing water can hide sharp debris and tripping hazards. The water can also be extremely cold, and if there are electrical outlets or appliances touching the water, there’s a risk of electrocution.

Signs of a Frozen Pipe?

There are several warning signs of frozen pipes or frozen faucets. Unfortunately, to the untrained eye, some of these signs can be difficult to spot.

Here are some red flags to be on the lookout for:

  • Temperatures. As we previously mentioned, it has to reach a 20 degrees for your pipes to freeze, so once the mercury drops below 32 degrees, that’s the time to take precautions.
  • Frost on the pipe. If your pipes are visible, you may be able to see frost accumulating.
  • No water is coming out of the faucet. A lack of running water can be another telltale sign.
  • Strange smells. Odd odors could mean that your pipe is partially or completely blocked, possibly due to freezing, as the only direction for the stench to escape is back toward your property.
frozen faucet

What To Do If Your Waterline Freezes?

Once you’re aware that a pipe is frozen, you must act quickly to thaw it. Depending on the location of the pipe and your level of expertise, you can attempt to thaw the pipe yourself or you can contact a licensed plumber to do the job for you. In any case, it’s imperative to thaw the pipe as soon as possible because it has the potential to burst and cause extensive damage to your property.

Can You Fix a Frozen Faucet Yourself?

If you consider yourself a handy person or you’re interested in trying a DIY project to prevent thousands of dollars in repairs, you can try to address frozen pipes yourself. Keep in mind, it can be difficult to pinpoint the frozen pipes.

Here are some of the steps necessary to thaw out your frozen pipes:

  • Locate the frozen pipe. If the blockage is in an area of your home that you have access to, you should look for signs of a freeze.
  • Open the faucet. In order to thaw out the pipe, you’ll need to open the faucet that the waterline feeds into.
  • Begin the thawing process. You should always begin near the faucet, then work your way toward the blockage, which ensures that any melted ice can make its way through the open faucet.
  • Thaw the exposed pipes. You can use a hairdryer, heat lamp, hot towels or electrical heating tape.
  • Thaw enclosed pipes. For pipes you can’t see, you can try to thaw them out by increasing the temperature of your home, using an infrared lamp or cutting out a section of your wall for direct access.

If you aren’t confident in your ability to thaw out the pipes yourself, contact a professional for assistance.

How Can You Keep Pipes From Freezing?

The best way to avoid paying thousands of dollars to repair damage caused by frozen pipes is to avoid the problem in the first place. Here are some proactive steps you can take:

  • Keep your house adequately heated
  • Allow faucets to drip slightly
  • Keep interior doors open
  • Seal up holes and cracks
  • Add insulation, which as an added benefit helps keep your house warmer in general
  • Remove exterior hoses

Do External Faucets Have an Indoor Shutoff Valve?

Whether your external faucet has an indoor shutoff valve will largely depend on where you live. If you live somewhere in the North, for example, where it gets very cold in the winter, it’s common to have a valve somewhere in the house. In warmer climates, it’s not uncommon for there to be no indoor valve.

When winterizing your house for the season, you should turn the indoor valve off and leave the outside one open so the water can drip out. The danger is that trapped water could freeze and burst the pipe. The valve will likely be either very near to where the pipe feeding the exterior fixture exits the house, or where the pipe splits from the main trunk line.

What Should You Do When the Outside Faucet Is on and Water Leaks into the Basement?

This type of issue is not uncommon in homes that have hoses that are connected to a water source located in the basement. If water gets backed up into your basement, the first thing you should do is reach out to an expert — and the sooner the better, as a large buildup of water can lead to extensive structural damage.

There are steps that you can take to prevent this from happening in the future. For example, you should drain your faucet before every winter to ensure your pipes remain clear of potential frost. If you don’t drain the water in advance, or it leaks and then the temperature drops sufficiently, it could split the outer pipe, which might then leak when you open the faucet.

Should I Install an Insulated Faucet Cover?

We brace for the cold weather to take its toll on us when the winter months come around — but an unexpected temperature drop might not leave you enough time to take preventive measures. It doesn’t take long for a snap of icy temperatures to cause the water in your spigot or indoor pipes to freeze.

By installing an insulated faucet cover, you can protect your home from unexpected freezes. Now, that’s not to say that you shouldn’t make the proper arrangements ahead of the colder months, but insulating your outdoor faucets with a Styrofoam cover can buy you some time when Old Man Winter sneaks up on you.

If you are dealing with frozen pipes, or you want to take steps to prevent frozen pipes, call the team here at Service Line Warranties of America to learn more about the packages we offer.

Since we’re all home now more than ever, being prepared for unexpected home repairs with a plan from Service Line Warranties of America is important. Having a plan in place gives you the peace of mind knowing that you can simply call our 24/7 repair hotline for covered breakdowns. See what plans are available in your neighborhood.

Thinking About a Solar Water Heater? Here are the Pros and Cons

Thinking About a Solar Water Heater? Here are the Pros and Cons

You hop into the shower and quickly jump back out again because the steaming water you were promised is nowhere to be found. If that’s the case, it may be time for a new hot water system. And as long as you’re in the market for one, consider a solar water heater.

This May Also Interest You: How Much Does It Cost to Install Solar Panels?

If you don’t know much about them, you may be hesitant to get a solar-powered water heater. (How much do they cost? How well do they work if the sun’s not shining?) But solar hot water systems can offer plenty of benefits to homeowners. You may find that buying one is a worthwhile investment for your home. Here’s what you need to know.

What’s a Solar Water Heater?

At their most basic, solar heating systems act as greenhouses for water. The technology isn’t new; the first system was patented in 1891. Systems have improved since then, and today, they use a set of solar panels — known as a solar collector — that trap heat. This heats the water, which is then stored.

When deciding on a solar hot water system, you can choose between an active system and a passive system. The main difference is that active systems have a circulating pump and controls. Passive systems tend to be less efficient, but they are less expensive and often last longer. An installer can help you determine which type works best for your home, water needs and location.

Is a Solar Water Heater Worth It?

The answer to this question is always going to depend on your individual circumstances, but most people find a solar water heating system is a good investment. If you’re trying to build a more eco-friendly lifestyle, solar water is a great addition to your home as it decreases your carbon footprint.

Even those not interested in going green for the environment find that a solar system helps give them more green financially by putting more money in their pocket. Although upfront costs can be high, these systems pay for themselves over time by reducing your energy bills.

However, solar hot water systems aren’t without their disadvantages. Your potential savings can differ depending on where you’re located, and some homeowners have to pay additional costs to prepare their homes for the systems. It’s important to understand both the pros and cons of installing solar hot water before deciding if it’s right for you.

What Are the Benefits of Solar Hot Water?

Cost Savings

The U.S. Department of Energy estimates that 19% of a household’s energy use goes toward heating water. In most homes, it accounts for the second-largest energy expenditure behind space heating. But once you have solar hot water installed, it doesn’t cost anything to heat the water because using the sun is free. The exact amount you can expect to save depends on a number of factors, such as how much hot water you use and where you live. However, the says that the average U.S. household saves 50% to 80% on their water heating bills after installing a solar hot water system. You’ll also be protected if there are fuel shortages or rising energy costs in the future.

Increased Home Value

Homes with green features are becoming increasingly popular, so solar hot water can help your resale value. It’s likely solar hot water will add value to your home when you’re ready to sell as buyers continue to look for energy-saving and environmentally friendly housing options.

Tax Credits

Currently, homeowners can get a federal government tax credit for the cost of materials and installation of a solar hot water system. The credit is 26% for systems installed before the end of 2022, which can help offset the initial cost of the system. Keep in mind that some states have additional credits available that can lower the cost of the system even further. The credit is only available for systems that heat water in your home, not those used to heat pools or hot tubs.

Environmentally Friendly

Solar hot water systems have a gas or electric backup system for overcast days, but most of your hot water is heated using 100% renewable energy. This means you’re lowering your household’s carbon footprint and keeping greenhouse gases out of the atmosphere.

More Related Articles:

What Are the Disadvantages of a Solar Water Heater?

Upfront Costs

HowMuch.net says the average cost of installing a solar hot water system is $4,120, but exact prices depend on the type of system and where you live. According to HomeServe data, replacing your old water heater with a regular, tanked model costs $1,741 on average.

There’s definitely a premium for installing solar. However, tax credits can help lower the costs. And according to Energy Star, solar hot water systems often last longer than traditional systems, so you can delay the cost of a replacement system.

Roof Space

Solar hot water panels are much smaller than solar electricity panels because they’re more efficient at converting sunlight to heat. Despite this, you do need room on your roof for the system. That space needs to be oriented in the right direction and can’t be covered by shade from trees or taller buildings. As the systems can be heavy, they may not be suitable for older houses. Or, you may need to reinforce the roof so it can hold the weight.

With all these considerations, you may find it hard to find an appropriate space for a solar water system. Installers are generally happy to visit your property to determine if a system will work for you.

Less Efficiency on Cloudy Days

Solar panels can generate heat on cloudy days, but you may find the system is less efficient in certain types of weather. This is especially true in northern states that get less sunshine during winter. The majority of systems have boosters that provide hot water when the sun isn’t up to the challenge, so you don’t need to worry about cold showers. However, you may have fewer financial benefits if you live in an area that lacks sunny days.

Maintenance Costs

All hot water systems need to be maintained, whether you’re flushing the system or checking the valves. However, solar systems can be more difficult to maintain yourself due to the nature of the parts. It can also be harder to find someone to do maintenance than it would be if you had a traditional system. You should keep these future costs in mind when making your decision.

Protect Your Home Against Flooding With This Sump Pump Maintenance Checklist

Protect Your Home Against Flooding With This Sump Pump Maintenance Checklist

During a storm, your basement is often the first place in your home to flood. Keeping it dry protects the rest of your home and possessions from water damage. You make even keep some of your most important possessions in the basement — like irreplaceable photos and important documents — which makes it even more important to have a working sump pump.

This May Also Interest You: Sump Pump Alarm Going Off? Here’s What to Do Next

How well you maintain your pump will impact how long it lasts — and whether it’ll be able to run properly when you need it to. Here’s a maintenance checklist you can use to extend your sump pump’s life and keep your home dry.

How Many Years Does a Sump Pump Last?

If you’re performing routine sump pump maintenance, you can expect to get up to 10 years out of your pump before you need to replace it. There are some factors that can reduce the life of your pump, so if you don’t test and repair it when you need to, you may find that it has a reduced operating life. Simple things such as not making sure that the pump is on an even surface and in an upright position may force the pump to work harder and for longer than it should. Accumulated debris inside of the pump pit, basin, discharge line and other operating parts can also damage the sump pump and cause it to malfunction.

Do Sump Pumps Need Maintenance?

You should perform sump pump maintenance at least once a year. Consider performing maintenance checks more often if you notice that it’s working more than usual because of an unusual accumulation of rain, snow or moisture due to the weather.

Preventative maintenance is less expensive in the long run than an early replacement. You run the risk of severe flooding if your pump can’t clear water from your basement as quickly as it accumulates. You should factor in the cost of repairing water damage to your home if this should happen. Some insurance companies might be resistant to pay claims if you didn’t perform regularly scheduled maintenance.

How Do You Test Your Sump Pump?

The easiest way to test whether your sump pump is working properly is to pour some water down the pit and see if the pump turns on. This is a great way to see how the entire system is operating because you can run outside and check the discharge line for signs of blockages or debris that has built up inside the pipe. Pay attention to where the water is exiting your home and the direction of the runoff.

You may need to make adjustments if the water is running onto your neighbor’s property or back toward your home. It’s a good idea to perform this test once a month so that you’re aware of any problems and can clean or repair your sump pump if necessary.

How Often Should You Clean Your Sump Pump?

You should clean your sump pump whenever you notice a buildup of debris or a change in how well it performs. Most of the time, you can resolve any issues by cleaning the components and locating the source of the obstructions in the system. If you clean your sump pump thoroughly and still notice that it’s not working properly, it might be time to have it repaired or replaced.

More Related Articles:

How to Perform Sump Pump Maintenance

You can maintain your sump pump yourself most of the time. Follow these easy steps to make sure that your pump is set up correctly and that all the components are free of debris:

  • Check that the pump is positioned correctly. Your sump pump works properly when it’s on a level surface and upright. If it’s leaning or the floor is not even, water won’t flow into it properly and the pump may have to work harder to clear water, or it may be unable to pump out any accumulating water.
  • Remove the cover and look inside. You might be surprised by what you find inside of the sump pump, but you can often clean out the debris by spraying the basin and internal components with a hose.
  • Check the drainage line. Some clogs can be due to a frozen line or natural debris buildup. When you check the pipe, also make sure that it’s connected securely to the sump pump.
  • Inspect and clean the inlet screen. The inlet screen is another common place where debris and gunk can accumulate and clog your pump.
  • Make sure that the float is working. One way that sump pumps die quickly is by being overworked. If your float isn’t functioning, the pump may activate when it doesn’t need to, and the engine can wear itself out from running all the time. It could also keep the pump from turning on when it needs to drain water from your basement.
  • Test the pump. Using the method mentioned above, give the sump pump a test to make sure that it’s activating properly and moving water out of your basement.
  • Make sure that the pump has multiple power options. After making sure that the pump has a power source, consider that it may rain or flood when your home doesn’t have power. You can buy a backup battery or a generator to ensure that your pump can work during an emergency that knocks out the power.
  • Consider having a backup sump pump. If your primary pump fails for any reason, having a second pump on hand can prevent basement flooding and minimize the damage done to your home in a flood.

If you’ve tried all these things and find that your pump isn’t working properly, the final step is to call someone that knows how to repair or replace your pump.

Tired of Tepid? Here’s How to Turn Up the Temp on Your Water Heater

Tired of Tepid? Here’s How to Turn Up the Temp on Your Water Heater

Turning Up Your Water Heater at a Glance

  • Step 1: Shut off power
  • Step 2: Remove access panel
  • Step 3: Pull back insulation
  • Step 4: Adjust thermostat temperature
  • Step 5: Replace insulation
  • Step 6: Reinstall access panel
  • Step 7: Turn power back on
  • For gas water heaters: Relight pilot light

A hot shower after a long day is soothing, but if your water heater is set too low, that’s a comfort you may be denied. Proper water temperature isn’t just about comfort. If the water coming out of your tap is only lukewarm, it may not kill harmful bacteria or get your dishes clean.

This May Also Interest You: How Do I Turn My Water Heater On?

Adjust the temperature of your water heater by following a few easy steps.

Why Might You Need to Turn Up Your Water Heater?

Although most homeowners want hotter water because of personal preference, there are two main reasons to consider raising the temperature on your water heater’s thermostat:

Safety

If your water heater is set too low, it can create an environment that’s ideal for bacteria. Disease-causing microorganisms such as Legionella — which causes Legionnaires’ Disease — thrive in lower temperatures. SFGATE says some health experts recommend setting your water heater to at least 120 degrees Fahrenheit to minimize bacterial growth.

Cleaning

If your dishwasher doesn’t have a booster heater, it may require higher temperatures for optimal cleaning. According to the U.S. Department of Energy, the ideal range typically falls between 130 and 140 degrees Fahrenheit.

Where Is My Water Heater Located?

In most houses, the water heater is located against an exterior wall in the garage or basement. You may also find your water heater in several other common places:

  • Utility closets
  • Crawlspaces
  • Attics
  • Bedroom closets

technician with water heater

How to Turn Up Your Water Heater

Depending on the type of water heater, the temperature interface may vary. Tankless heaters typically feature an easy-to-use digital control panel to set temperatures, whereas traditional electric or gas water heaters may feature a dial near the unit’s base that can be adjusted by turning it to the desired temperature.

Adjusting the temperature on newer gas or electric water heaters may be more involved and can be completed by following these simple steps:

  1. Shut off power to the water heater at the circuit breaker.
  2. Locate and remove the thermostat’s access panel.
  3. Pull back the insulation.
  4. Adjust the thermostat’s temperature setting using a flathead screwdriver. If your heater has two thermostats, both need to be adjusted the same amount, with the top thermostat set a few degrees higher than the bottom thermostat.
  5. Replace the insulation.
  6. Reinstall the access panel.
  7. Return the circuit breaker to the ON position.
  8. For gas water heaters, you may also need to relight the pilot light.

Before adjusting the temperature setting of any hot water heater, you should test the thermostat’s accuracy. To get an accurate reading, run hot water from the faucet nearest the heater for at least three minutes. Then, hold a cooking thermometer under the hot water stream to get a temperature reading.

After adjusting the thermostat, wait at least three hours and check the temperature again using a thermometer. If the temperature needs additional adjustment, repeat the appropriate steps.

More Related Articles:

What Precautions Should You Take When Turning Up Your Water Heater?

Turning up the temperature on your hot water heater may have its benefits, but it can also cause safety risks. Water above 130 degrees Fahrenheit can scald you, and water above 140 degrees Fahrenheit can cause third-degree burns. Young children and the elderly are especially susceptible.

In extreme cases where the water in a heater tank reaches 212 degrees Fahrenheit, it can turn to steam, which can cause the tank to burst, potentially resulting in major injuries and severe damage. If your faucet is releasing steam instead of hot water, or if your heater’s T&P valve has escaping steam or water, shut down your unit immediately.

How Hot or Cold Does Your Water Heater Go?

Water heaters can typically be set anywhere from 60 degrees to 160 degrees Fahrenheit. However, some units feature dials that include settings ranging from “warm” to “very hot.” Most modern units have a default setting of 140 degrees Fahrenheit.

Will Turning Up Your Water Heater Increase Your Utility Bills?

Yes. The higher your water heater is set, the more energy you’ll use, resulting in higher utility bills. The opposite is also true. For every 10 degrees you lower your thermostat, you can save between 3% to 5% on energy costs. A smart water heater can also help improve energy efficiency.

What If Turning It Up Doesn’t Solve the Issue?

The thermostat setting isn’t always the cause of a lack of hot water. Other reasons for low or no hot water include:

  • Sediment: Over time, sediment can accumulate in your water heater. If your tank isn’t drained periodically, it could lead to reduced efficiency and clogs that reduce the water temperature.
  • A pilot light that’s out: On gas heaters, the pilot light can go out due to a breeze or downdraft, leaving your heater nonfunctional.
  • Power surges: Power surges can interfere with your heater. If you’ve recently had a storm, turning your unit off and then on again may solve the problem.
Here’s How to Hack Your Low-Flow Showerhead … But Should You?

Here’s How to Hack Your Low-Flow Showerhead … But Should You?

Low water pressure in the shower is annoying. Some days, it seems like the water is just trickling out of the showerhead, producing hardly enough flow to rinse the shampoo out of your hair. If you have a low-flow showerhead, this problem is probably all too familiar to you. These showerheads limit the water pressure to save on water and energy costs — but if it costs you your sanity in the process, is it really worth it?

This May Also Interest You: Showerhead Stuck? Here’s How to Remove It

A quick internet search will reveal plenty of tutorials describing how to increase water pressure in the shower if you have a low-flow showerhead. However, using these DIY fixes could increase your utility bills and even put you on the wrong side of the law, as we’ll explain below.

What Is a Low-Flow Showerhead?

A low-flow showerhead is specially designed to use less water for cost and environmental reasons. According to Exelon, to qualify as low-flow, the showerhead should release water at a rate of no more than 2.5 gallons per minute.

Low-flow showerheads can save you a significant amount of money on your water and water heating bills. They’re also helpful for water conservation. Using less water during your shower helps reduce the amount of saltwater that needs to be desalinated for drinking and washing. The desalination process uses a lot of energy and is expensive, so reducing the need for desalination is good for the planet and could even lower taxes.

Why Does My Showerhead Have No Pressure?

If you’ve just installed a brand-new showerhead and find that the pressure is suddenly lower, it’s probably because you’ve purchased a water-saving showerhead. Check the labels around the rim, or perform the showerhead GPM test as described below. If the showerhead flow rate is lower than the legal limit in your area, you could consider replacing it with a more powerful one.

If you had water pressure problems before installing a new showerhead and the issue continues, the reason for your low water pressure could be down to blocked, leaking or damaged pipes or an issue with the shower controls. In this situation, it’s best to call a professional plumber to inspect your plumbing and repair any damaged pipes or mechanisms.

How Do I Know If My Showerhead Is Low-Flow?

Often, you can determine whether your showerhead is low-flow by reading any labels printed around the rim. If your showerhead is labeled 2.5 GPM or less, you have a low-flow showerhead. Any showerhead labeled 2.6 GPM or above is a high-flow showerhead.

If your showerhead doesn’t have a label, try this trick to determine the flow rate. Place a bucket or container with a 1-gallon marker under the showerhead. If your showerhead can fill it to the gallon marker in 20 seconds or less, it is high-flow. If it takes more than 20 seconds, it is low-flow.

More Related Articles:

How Do I Increase the Flow on My Low-Flow Showerhead?

Most low-flow showerheads have a rubber pressure-reducing valve (called a regulator) to maintain a lower pressure. You can increase the flow by simply taking it out. You could also consider enlarging the hole that allows water into your showerhead with a drill to increase the amount of water coming through.

Should I Remove the Regulator in My Low-Flow Showerhead?

The regulator in a low-flow showerhead limits the amount of water that can flow through it, reducing the pressure. Some people choose to remove the regulator to achieve less restricted water flow. While the obvious advantage of doing this is significantly higher water pressure, there are a couple of reasons why it might not be such a great idea.

The U.S. Department of Energy is likely to reimpose a legal flow rate limit of 2.5 GPM for showerheads as a part of its energy-saving efforts. The law was previously revised to allow for higher water pressure using multiple showerheads, but the Department of Energy has stated that it intends to return to the previous low-flow laws. Therefore, it’s a good idea to test your showerhead flow rate — especially after taking steps to increase the pressure — to ensure that it won’t fall afoul of federal law in the future.

Some states may impose tighter restrictions on legal showerhead flow rates, often to help maintain a steady freshwater supply during hot weather. For example, the standard legal flow rate in both Hawaii and Washington State is 1.8 GPM. It’s worth checking the restrictions in your area before tampering with your showerhead.

In addition, removing the flow regulator will also increase your overall water usage and the amount of power used for heating water, which is bad for your wallet and the environment.

How to Refinish or Reglaze a Bathtub

How to Refinish or Reglaze a Bathtub

Refinishing a Bathtub at a Glance

  • Tools & Materials: Putty knife, screwdriver, masking tape, scraping tool, Lysol cleaner, palm sander, refinishing kit
  • Step 1: Remove caulk
  • Step 2: Remove drain and overflow plate
  • Step 3: Clean and prep area
  • Step 4: Prep coating
  • Step 5: Apply coating
  • Step 6: Add caulk

When your bathtub has grown old and becomes worn out, you might consider replacing it. Unfortunately, replacing a bathtub isn’t the easiest thing, and the costs can quickly add up. But getting rid of your old tub isn’t the only option if you want to make your bathroom look fresh. You can always refinish or reglaze the bathtub instead.

This May Also Interest You: How to Remove a Bathtub in 4 Simple Steps

Tub reglazing or refinishing costs significantly less than a full tub replacement. By applying a new layer of epoxy paint to your bathtub, you can make it look brand new again. Here’s how to do it.

bathroom bathtub re-glazing-BEFORE

What’s the Difference Between Reglazing and Refinishing?

“Reglazing” and “refinishing” both refer to the same process of restoring an old bathtub and making it look new again. You might hear some professionals call the process “refinishing” and others call it “reglazing,” but at the end of the day, they’re the same thing.

Can You Reglaze a Tub with Rust Spots?

As the topcoat of the tub deteriorates and exposes the metal surface, it can lead to rust. The continuous mix of air and water helps speed up the rusting process. Luckily, it’s entirely possible to still reglaze a tub with rust spots. You just need to sand it adequately before you cover it up with the new coating.

Refinishing a Bathtub: 6 Steps

Bathtub refinishing fumes can be harmful to people, so make sure you wear safety equipment and send everyone else out of the house when doing this. If you don’t feel too comfortable or confident with this project, it’s better to hire a professional that knows exactly what they’re doing.

Tools and Materials

You will want to wear safety equipment like gloves and safety glasses. Tools required for the job include a putty knife, screwdriver, masking tape, scraping tool, Lysol cleaner and palm sander. You can buy a bathtub finishing kit that comes with epoxy paint and application tools to apply it.

Step 1: Remove the Existing Caulk

Part of the process for reglazing is adding new caulk. You will want to remove any existing caulking around the entire bathtub. Use a scraping tool to scrape all around the tub, including the open side bottom, and remove all the caulk.

Step 2: Remove the Drain and Overflow Plate

One of the most common mistakes inexperienced DIYers make is leaving in the tub drain and overflow plate. You will want to remove these to get the most out of your refinish and ensure it lasts for years. To remove the overflow plate, use a screwdriver.

Removing the drain is a very crucial step to ensure you get a smooth finish. When the drain is not taken out, the area around the drain will deteriorate since it wasn’t adequately refinished. In the worst-case scenario, some of the coating may go inside the drain and cause issues.

To remove the drain, you can use a drain tool. If it’s an older drain, you’ll need to use pliers and force it out of there. After that’s done, add a cup below the drain hole so that when you apply the material, it falls into the cup rather than your pipes.

Step 3: Clean the Tub and Prepare the Area

You should clean the tub at least one day before you plan to do the refinishing. Any water that remains will make the process more complicated. To clean the tub, use a Lysol cleaner and spray it across the entire area. Then, dip the scrub brush in water, scrub the tub gently and wash it down with more water. After washing it, wait a day before proceeding.

Add cardboards or newspaper to the floors to catch any accidental spills and prevent stains. Tape around the tub. When you’re taping the open side of it, ensure that the tape on the bottom is also slightly taped to the tub instead of just the floor. When you tape the enclosed sides of the tub, you can just tape the tile. The benefit of cleaning the tub the day before is that it will be easy to tape around the area without worrying about moisture.

More Related Articles:

bathroom bathtub re-glazing-AFTER

Step 4: Prepare the Coating

If you ordered a bathtub finishing kit, you’ll have two containers. Part B is the activator which you will want to pour into the main base container. Then, use the stirring stick that comes with the kit and make sure the epoxy paint is thoroughly mixed.

As a side note, you shouldn’t use any mixing tools for this since mixers will bring in air and often lead to bubbles in the material, which is not ideal. It can only be done by hand, so do it gently. According to Home Repair Tutor, the minimum amount of time you should spend stirring is 10 minutes. It’s an essential step to get a quality finish. After you finish mixing, let it sit for another 10 minutes.

Step 5: Apply the Coating

Pick up the can and pour it onto the edges of the tub, letting it slide down them. Then, use a roller to distribute the material all around the tub. Ensure you gently spread it along the edges and let the material roll down the sides. The key here is to use the roller gently and let it spread the epoxy all around.

A scooper will come along with the kit that you can use to scoop the epoxy and add it all around the tub. You can also use a putty knife to apply the paint to other places if that’s easier. Make sure all the areas are covered, especially around the overflow plate and drain hole. Another common mistake is not getting the material into the corners, so make sure those are covered.

Since the material falls down the sides on both ends, use a scooper or putty knife to pick up large quantities before they build up on the bathroom floor.

Step 6: Add Caulk

Let the material sit for the next 24 hours before you apply the caulk. When you come back, the material around the caulking areas will have hardened around the tub, so use a knife or glazing tool to cut through it. After that’s done, remove all the tape and caulk the edges.

How Many Times Can You Reglaze a Tub?

While you might have done a perfect job refinishing the first time, things always become worn out after years of use. It’s possible to reglaze or refinish a bathtub that has already been refinished once. However, the underlying layer will require more preparation in terms of cleaning and sanding, so it’s best to let a professional do it the second time around.

As an alternative, you can always install a tub liner instead. A tub liner is a PVC sheet or acrylic mold that is added over your existing bathtub. You will also want a professional to do this job since accurate measurements are crucial for manufacturing one that fits well with the tub.

How Long Does Reglazing Last?

A reglaze can last anywhere from 10 to 20 years, depending on the quality of the job. Performing routine maintenance, like cleaning the bathtub, can help extend its life. A professional reglaze will also last longer than a DIY project.

What’s a Wet Room?

What’s a Wet Room?

A wet room is a bathroom, except the whole thing’s designed to get wet. Think floor-to-ceiling tile, waterproof décor and a shower that’s out in the open. Wet rooms are certainly trendy as of late, and it’s no wonder why: They’re functional, accessible and may even raise the value of your home.

This May Also Interest You: How Much Does a Shower Remodel Cost?

Wet rooms are a popular bathroom style in some European countries. The minimalist concept crams everything a bathroom needs — a toilet, shower and sink — into as little space as possible. In particularly cramped spaces, you might see a showerhead above the toilet and the drain in the center of the room.

The floor is slightly sloped toward the drain so you’re not left with any standing water. Often, the sink and toilet are “floating” models anchored to the wall so there are no extra spaces for water to collect and form mildew or mold. If there’s room, you might also have a waterproof cabinet to store the things you’d rather keep dry.

American iterations of the wet room are usually larger, with multiple showerheads, spa-like tile and perhaps a bathtub. You may also see semi-wet rooms where the shower is tucked behind a small half wall or glass divider.

Benefits of a Wet Room

Here are four reasons why you’d want a wet room:

1. Accessibility

In a traditional wet room, there are no barriers. That makes the space accessible for household members who may have mobility issues or use mobility aids. Depending on the placement of your fixtures, you can use the closed toilet as a shower seat. It’s also a great setup for pet parents: You don’t have to worry about the inevitable splash-over when you’re trying to give your dog a bath.

2. Easy to Clean

Everything is made to get wet, so it’s easy enough just to spray down the whole room when it comes time to clean. There’s no need for a shower curtain or a bathmat, so the only textiles that need to be laundered are the towels.

3. Makes the Most of Your Space

Not all bathrooms are created equal, space-wise. When you’re remodeling, you may find yourself having to choose between the walk-in shower and a big, luxurious bathtub. A wet room allows you to combine those features in one space. Wet rooms don’t need to be large, either. They can often fit all the fixtures of a full bathroom in the same space as a half-bath.

4. Resale Value

According to data from Remodeling Magazine, you could recoup up to 64% of the cost of a midrange bathroom remodel when you sell your home. A wet room is considered a “high-end addition,” so depending on the quality of the materials, you may see a higher return on your investment.

However, a lot of buyers aren’t looking to go all in on wet rooms. And most buyers are looking for a house with a bathtub. Fixr recommends homeowners keep at least one American-style bathroom. Converting a small half-bath, the kids’ bathroom or the guest bathroom into a wet room may be a lucrative investment.

More Related Articles:

Can You Turn an Existing Bathroom Into a Wet Room?

Yes, but it’s going to require a serious remodel — and almost certainly not a DIY one. The drain sits at a lower level than everything else, so the floor will have to be reconstructed with a grade that will allow the water to flow toward it. The walls and floor will need to be waterproofed.

You’ll also run into a lot of limitations with the materials you can put in a wet room. Usually, the only options are tile, porcelain, metal and plastic. Say goodbye to wood accents or cabinetry. You’ll probably have to cover your walls in tile, too.

How Much Does It Cost to Install a Wet Room?

Due to the aforementioned extras, it costs a bit more to install a wet room than it does to remodel a traditional, American-style bathroom. Remodeling a traditional bathroom costs about $18,000 on average, where a wet room costs over $21,000. The difference comes down to the price of waterproofing materials. If you choose to install something like radiant floor heating, that’ll cost you extra, too.

Since we’re all home now more than ever, being prepared for unexpected home repairs with a plan from Service Line Warranties of America is important. Having a plan in place gives you peace of mind knowing that you can simply call our 24/7 repair hotline for covered breakdowns. See what plans are available in your neighborhood.

How to Tighten a Faucet Handle

Tightening a Faucet Handle at a Glance

  • Tools & Materials: Allen wrench, screwdriver, wrench, flashlight, plumber’s tape, thread sealant
  • Tightening a Set Screw:
    • Step 1: Remove covers
    • Step 2: Tighten screw
    • Optional: Add thread sealant
  • Tightening a Retainer Nut
    • Step 1: Clear space under sink
    • Step 2: Locate retaining nut
    • Step 3: Tighten nut
    • Optional: Wrap with plumber’s tape

A loose faucet handle is no doubt annoying. But did you know that a loose faucet handle can also damage your sink’s plumbing lines over time? That being said, tightening a loose faucet handle is something you should address sooner rather than later.

This May Also Interest You: How to Replace or Install a Bathroom Faucet

The good news is that it’s easy to fix, and there’s no need to dish out any of your hard-earned cash for a professional plumber. Read on to learn how to easily tighten a faucet handle.

Tools and Materials

  • Allen (Hex) wrench
  • Screwdriver: Phillips- or flat-head, depending on the faucet
  • Wrench: Adjustable, combination or basin
  • Flashlight
  • Optional: Teflon thread (plumber’s) tape
  • Optional: Non-permanent thread sealant

Why Is My Faucet Handle Loose?

Faucet handles can naturally become loose over time, but they may also be loose because of a sloppy or improper faucet replacement. Regardless of the reason, there are two main causes of loose faucet handles:

The Set or Handle Screw Is Loose

On most faucets, the handle will be secured to the faucet by a small Allen screw (set screw) that’s screwed horizontally into the outside perimeter of the handle’s base plate cover, or with a Phillips- or flat-head screw (handle screw) that’s screwed vertically into the handle’s base. Single-handle faucets will likely only use a single-set screw. Two-handled faucets may use a retaining nut, handle screw or both, depending on the model.

The Retaining Nut Is Loose

A sink’s faucet or handles are sometimes secured to the sink with a retaining nut located underneath the sink. If this nut becomes loose, the handle will become loose.

How to Tighten a Faucet Handle

Before performing any of these steps, you should turn off the water supply to your faucet. While this step isn’t a mandatory step, doing so will eliminate the possibility of flooding if you damage any plumbing components during the repair.

There are two shut-off valves (angle valves or angle stops) underneath the sink and coming out of the wall. Turn each of the valves clockwise (“righty-tighty”) until they’re fully closed. Fully open the faucet handles to relieve the residual water pressure and to verify that your water supply is turned off.

step-by-step instructional guide on how to tighten the temperature handles on a sink  In this case, we are looking at an oil rubbed faucet on a utility sink

Tightening the Set Screw or Handle Screw

Locate the set screw or handle screw. If your faucet handle is secured to the baseplate with a set screw, there will be a small hole somewhere around the perimeter of the cover. Inside this hole will be a small Allen screw. Select the appropriate Allen wrench, then gently turn the set screw clockwise until the screw is firmly seated.

step-by-step instructional guide on how to tighten the temperature handles on a sink  In this case, we are looking at an oil rubbed faucet on a utility sink

If your handle uses a handle screw, begin by removing the decorative caps on the top of the handles. These will often be labeled or colored — “H” or red for hot and “C” or blue for cold. You can either use a knife or flat-head screwdriver to gently pry these covers off. Inside, you should see a Philips- or flat-head screw. Turn this screw clockwise until the screw is firmly seated.

Physically inspect the faucet handle to verify your repair was successful. For a stronger and longer-lasting repair, you can fully remove the screws and add a non-permanent thread sealant compound to the screw’s threads. This will help to prevent the screw from coming loose in the future.

step-by-step instructional guide on how to tighten the temperature handles on a sink  In this case, we are looking at an oil rubbed faucet on a utility sink

Tightening a Retainer Nut

Clear the space under your sink. Remove any cleaning or kitchen supplies you have stored under your sink to make room for you to work.

Slide under your sink, resting on your back and facing the underside of your sink. Using a flashlight to increase visibility, locate the retaining nut holding the faucet handle in place.

Select the right wrench and tighten the nut. You can use an adjustable wrench, combination wrench (with one open wrench end and one box wrench end) or basin wrench to tighten the nut. Either set the adjustable wrench to the appropriate size or select a wrench that fits the retaining nut. A basin wrench might be required if the retaining nut is too difficult to access with a conventional wrench.

Turn the nut in a clockwise direction until snug. You can also fully remove the nut and wrap the female threads the nut screws onto with plumber’s tape for a stronger and longer-lasting hold. Come out from under the sink and physically verify that the handle is tight.

More Related Articles:

How Do You Fix a Faucet Handle That Keeps Turning?

Most faucet handles are designed with internal “stops” that only let the handle turn in a limited range of motion. For example, a half-turn in the clockwise direction will turn the faucet fully on, and a half-turn in the counter-clockwise direction will turn the faucet off. The component responsible for this limited range of motion is the faucet cartridge.

When the faucet cartridge becomes stripped (either over time or due to the wear-and-tear from a loose handle), the handle will turn continuously without stopping, resulting in leaks and other plumbing issues. Take the following steps to replace the cartridge:

1. Shut off the water supply to your faucet.

2. Remove the handle using the steps in previous sections to expose the cartridge. The cartridge’s appearance will vary between faucet models, but it will always be directly underneath the faucet handle.

3. Locate the nut holding the cartridge in place. The nut will be at the base of the cartridge, resting on top of the sink.

4. Remove the nut. Select the appropriately sized wrench for the nut, then turn counter-clockwise to remove it from the threaded stem it’s seated on. Slip the nut over the cartridge to free the cartridge.

5. Remove the old cartridge and replace it with a new one.

6. Place the nut back onto the threaded stem and tighten it clockwise with your wrench until snug. You can also wrap the threads with plumber’s tape before reinstalling the nut for a stronger connection.

7. Reinstall the faucet handle and physically inspect it to verify the success of your repair.

8. Turn the faucet’s water supply back on.