Does a home warranty cover water and sewer lines?

Does a Home Warranty cover Water and Sewer Lines?

My grandmother used to say, “You never know how good things are ‘til they are gone.” When it comes to your appliances and home systems working properly, this is so true. We all rely upon our water running, our dishwasher washing and our heat warming.

And while we all take our essential home infrastructure for granted, a homeowner can be unsure how to proceed when things go wrong. Fortunately, you can be prepared with a home repair plan that includes provisions for covered repairs of your water line or clogged sewer line.

Water and sewer coverage 101

Before you decide on a home repair plan or home warranty, it’s always important to know exactly what a given plan will offer you in terms of repair coverage for different systems and appliances.

According to Consumer Reports.org, it is fairly common for a home repair or home warranty plan that addresses household infrastructure to include provisions for repairs to the internal plumbing, as it’s one of any home’s critical systems along with the electrical wiring and water heater. But coverage for indoor plumbing does not always mean that the water and sewer lines – which run underground from the outskirts of your house’s foundation to the municipal pipes underneath all of the nearby streets – are necessarily covered.

Along similar lines, if you have a septic tank to handle your home’s wastewater instead of being connected to your city’s sewer-line network, be sure to check if the tank and the pipes that connect it to your internal plumbing are covered. Some plans that might cover exterior water and sewer lines won’t be adaptable to homes that use septic systems.

Learn More About Home Repair Plans Near You

Additionally, keep in mind that homeowner’s insurance will often only be of help if your plumbing, water or sewer lines suffered sudden and catastrophic damage, according to Policygenius.

Line-specific plans from SLWA

By turning to Service Line Warranties of America, you can find yourself a number of different home repair plan options to protect your water and sewer lines. First off, there are plans that cover individual aspects of the exterior plumbing:

  • Sewer/septic line coverage: With this plan, the essential steps for finding and repairing a problematic sewer or septic line are covered – replacement or repair of pipes, seals and joints, unblocking, fusing, welding, pipe-cutting, valve-fitting and restoration of any exterior home areas disturbed by the repair process.
  • Water line coverage: Everything described above, but for the water line instead.

Being prepared for plumbing, water line, sewer line and other household breakdowns is always a smart choice. Learn more on how  a plan from Service Lines Warranties of America can help you with the costs of covered repairs.

How much does it cost to install or replace a garbage disposal

by Meghan Stiltner

garbage disposal installed under sink

You don’t realize how frequently you use your garbage disposal until it stops working. And when it happens, all you want to know is the quickest, least-costly way to get back to grinding.

This May Also Interest You: How to Install a Garbage Disposal on Your Own

If your garbage disposal isn’t working, it’s important to get it fixed to prevent a clogged sink — or maybe you don’t have a garbage disposal and are looking to have one installed. Read on to learn about the cost to do the work yourself versus calling in a pro.

How much does a garbage disposal cost?

There are many options that you can choose from at varying price ranges. You’ll have to first determine what your budget is and choose the best option within that sum. Garbage disposals can cost as little as $50 and range all the way up to $250 or more depending on the size and brand you choose.

On average, the cost of installation will run from around $120 up to $600. Where you live plays a role in how much service-call charges are.

How long do garbage disposals last?

Your garbage disposal’s useful lifespan will depend on how often you use it. If it’s something you use just here and there, you’ll likely get the maximum life out of it, which on average is 10 years out — though there still may be some repairs needed from time to time. As with any home appliance, proper maintenance and use according to manufacturer instructions are important.

How much does a garbage disposal replacement cost?

When your garbage disposal is in need of replacement, you’ll want to call around to the local plumbing companies to get quotes so you can choose the best offer. After all, does the need for home repairs ever arrive when we’re financially prepared for it? The good news is that you shouldn’t need to have this done very often as long so you don’t put things down the drain that don’t belong there.

How much does garbage disposal repair cost?

On average, most repairs will cost you around $250, including labor. Plumbers generally charge around $80 an hour.

In deciding whether to repair it or replace it, be sure to consider the cost of the disposal itself: It may make more sense to simply replace it. That likely comes with additional costs, so be prepared.

Are garbage disposals worth the money?

Everyone has to make up their own mind on what is valuable to them — but if you use your kitchen a lot for cooking, odds are you’ll be happy you have this particular appliance. It can cut down on the amount of smelly food waste you forget about in the garbage until it’s already stunk up the place. That said, you have to maintain your disposal, or it’ll get odorific as well.

Can I replace or repair my own garbage disposal?

Households often opt to have an expert do this particular dirty work for them, but the answer is yes: If you’re confident in your ability to do it yourself, you can. You’ll almost certainly save money versus making a service call.

For most such repairs, you can expect to pay around $75; a replacement will cost more. Although, if you do it yourself, you’ll save a substantial chunk of change on labor.

Tools needed to repair a garbage disposal

You’ll need the right tools and supplies to work on your garbage disposal. Many of the items you may already have around your home but, if not, any local hardware store should have them.

Here’s a checklist of things you may need:

  • A bucket
  • Safety glasses
  • Plumber’s putty
  • A putty knife
  • A new garbage disposal
  • A screwdriver
  • Screws
  • A hammer

Since we’re all home now more than ever, being prepared for unexpected home repairs with a plan from Service Line Warranties of America is important. Having a plan in place gives you the peace of mind knowing that you can simply call our 24/7 repair hotline for covered breakdowns. See how plans from Service Lines Warranties of America can help with the costs of home repairs.

How to clear a clogged drain

Have you ever glanced down at a drain and realized it’s moving slowly or even stopped draining altogether? Clogged drains can definitely look gross, but you don’t have to let them be a major hassle. With a few easy steps, you can handle most drain clogs at home.

Safety first: Always follow the directions on any chemicals carefully, and be sure to wear protective gear when handling chemicals or hot liquids. Also, turn off the water before snaking the drain, just in case a leak develops.

Step 1: Try removing the clog manually

If you have long hair that’s causing a clog right at the top of the drain, you’re in luck! As unpleasant as it might seem to remove a clog manually, it’s actually easier to deal with than a clogged drain that occurs farther down in your pipes. All you have to do is carefully detach the drain stopper, pull out the drain, and clean the hair, grime, and other gunk from it. This lets you unclog your drain without chemicals. For the typical bathroom drain clogged with hair, this is the simplest method of removing the drain clog.

Step 2: Create a DIY clogged drain remover

Have a clog that’s a bit too deep in the pipe to pull out by hand? You may want to try to unclog it by using a drain clog remover, like Drano®. There are some ready-made chemical solutions that can be effective, but before you take a trip to the store, try using one of these homemade solutions instead.

  • Pour boiling hot water down the drain. This can dissolve mildew, slime, soap scum, and other similar clogs.
  • Put half a cup of baking soda in the drain, then pour half a cup of vinegar down after it. Let this mixture sit for an hour, and then check the drain. The bubbles that form can break up some clogs.
  • Mix together half a cup of table salt and half a cup of baking soda. Pour this mixture down the drain and let it sit for half an hour. Then, pour a few cups of boiling water down the drain.
  • Put one-fourth cup of salt in the drain, then pour in one-fourth cup of borax. Follow it up with half a cup of vinegar. Let this mixture sit for an hour before running water down the drain.

Step 3: Use a plunger on the drain

You might be surprised to learn that a plunger can work just as well for a clogged sink as it can for a clogged toilet. Get a drain plunger that has a larger bell and a sturdier handle. Seal any other connected drain openings and clamp off the line that goes to the dishwasher. Then, fill the sink with a few inches of water and place the plunger over the drain. Firmly pump the handle up and down for about 20 seconds, forcing water through the drain. This can bust up the obstruction and get things moving again.

Step 4: Try a commercial clogged drain remover

Commercial drain clog removers are made of powerful chemicals, so they can be a helpful solution for stubborn clogs. Just keep in mind that these are meant to literally dissolve hair and grease, so if they splash on you, they can be dangerous. Repeated use of chemical clogged drain products can be problematic. The cleaners tend to generate heat as they work, which can soften PVC pipes or put pressure on pipe fittings. Be aware that repeatedly using them can cause a leak to develop.

Step 5: Snake the drain

When all else fails, turn to the reliable old drain auger. Also called a snake, this is a tool that travels through the pipe until it runs into the clog and busts it up. Most experts agree it’s one of the best ways to unclog a drain pipe. If you don’t already own this tool, they’re widely available at home improvement stores and fairly affordable. To use it, all you need to do is put it against the drain opening and turn the handle to feed the snake into the pipe. Once it hits the clog, you’ll feel resistance. Keep turning it to spin the head of the snake into the clog and break it into smaller pieces. You can also try pulling the auger backward, which can sometimes yank out an attached clog.

Step 6: Get professional assistance

If you have tried to unclog a drain with DIY methods and aren’t getting anywhere, don’t force it. It’s possible to damage your plumbing by banging around in there without any clue of what you’re doing. In some cases, it might be wiser to get professional assistance. Some drain clogs are deep in the main drain line of your home where DIY methods can’t reach them. Sometimes, the clog is just too stubborn to remove with basic tools. In these cases, you may need an expert plumber who can scope out the drain, identify the problem, and address it properly.

Don’t let a clogged drain stop you from using your sink, shower, or tub. Having a plan from Service Line Warranties of America in place can help make it easy to clear drain clogs. When you have an issue, call our 24/7 helpline, we’ll assist you with setting up an appointment with a licensed plumber. Our plans cover the cost of repairs up to the benefit amount, so you have peace of mind. Find out more about plumbing plans from Service Line Warranties of America today.