How to Clean a Shower Head

How to Clean a Shower Head

Now that I am staying at home each day due to the COVID-19 pandemic, my morning commute entails going from my bed to my shower to my home office. Unfortunately, this extra time in the shower has allowed me to notice that my shower head is in need of some definite TLC. Should I order a new one from Home Depot? Or maybe just clean the one I have?
 
If your shower head is like mine and has seen better days, you don’t necessarily need to upgrade to a new fixture right away. A little elbow grease can go a long way when it comes to eliminating soap scum and mineral buildup.

The following method by far the best way to clean your shower head. It just takes some good scrubbing, a descaling soak and a quick polish. And, it’s a great way to beat the grime with materials you already have lying around at home.

What You’ll Need

Here’s what you should have on hand before getting started:

  • Soft-bristled cleaning brush or sponge.
  • Plastic gallon bag.
  • Rubber band or twist-tie.
  • Vinegar.
  • Water.
  • Toothpick (optional).
  • Baking soda (optional).
  • Microfiber cloth (optional).

Side note: Since this green cleaning method doesn’t use harsh chemicals, you won’t need to wear cleaning gloves. But, by all means, if your shower head looks as gross as some of the ones I’ve seen (in whose bathroom? I’ll never say!) … well, you might just want a pair anyway.

Step 1: Scrub

First, you’ll need to scrub the shower head. Use a soft-bristled cleaning brush or rough sponge to knock the crusty mineral deposits out of the sprayer holes. Real Simple recommends using a trusty old toothbrush.

Be careful: Wire wool and hard-bristled brushes may scratch or damage fine metal finishes. Be sure to use soft bristles and gentle scrubbing pressure to avoid this. If your shower head holes are surrounded by flexible plastic rings, you can even poke the buildup out with your finger or a toothpick.

Run the shower to see if the water flows out in a straight jet with consistent water pressure. If it doesn’t, pay a little extra scrubbing attention to the clogged-up holes.

Step 2: Soak

Soaking is a great way to descale the fixture and get rid of both the residue and hard water spots you can’t clear off with just a brush.

Fill a plastic bag — preferably of the sturdy zip-top gallon variety — with your own DIY cleaning solution. Good Housekeeping suggests using one part hot water and one part white vinegar. Half a cup of each should do.

Lift the bag with vinegar and water onto the shower head so that the sprayer holes are totally submerged in your cleaning solution. Use a rubber band or twist tie to secure the bag in place at the top or along the neck of the shower head.

Leave it there to soak for anywhere from 30 minutes to several hours, depending on the finish of your showerhead and how caked-on the buildup is.

For fixtures coated with brass, nickel, or gold, keep the bag in place for just 15 to 30 minutes. Any longer and the acid might eat away at the finish. With other fixtures, feel free to leave the solution on overnight. This will give the vinegar solution a chance to loosen up the limescale around the shower head.

If it still looks a little clogged, repeat the process — this time, Better Homes and Gardens suggests adding a few tablespoons of baking soda in the solution and leaving it on for about 30 minutes.

Step 3: Rinse

After the soaking time is up, remove the bag and discard the cleaning solution down the shower drain. Gently scrub the shower head with a damp sponge or cleaning brush to wipe off any remaining residue.

Finally, run water through the shower head for a minute or so to flush out the system.

Step 4: Polish

Although this step is optional and just for show, you can buff the metal fixture with a soft microfiber cloth to restore its gleam. Make sure to soak up any moisture to prevent those pesky white water droplets from forming.

Bonus Step: Plumbing Protection

The shower head tends to be one of those things you use and see all the time, but very rarely think to maintain.

Many of us have the same attitude toward our home plumbing systems. All the elements are right there in front of us, we use them daily, but how often do we show them the care and attention they need?

After polishing off your bathroom fixtures and giving the tub a good old scrub, you may find yourself thinking about having a home repair plan in place to protect your budget from the costs of covered plumbing repairs.

See how plans from Service Lines Warranties of America can help with the costs of home repairs.

How to Know if Your Bathtub has Hard Water

How to Know if Your Bathtub has Hard Water

The first time I cleaned the shower in my new home, I couldn’t get the soap scum off the bathtub. No matter how much I scrubbed, no matter which cleaning products I used, it wouldn’t budge. When my neighbor mentioned it might be caused by “hard” water, I thought “what is she talking about.” To me the concept of “hard” or “soft” doesn’t apply to something like water. To me, water is just simply wet. Upon further research, I quickly realized there really is such a thing and there’s a big difference between having hard or soft water.

So, I am saving you some time and energy by sharing my knowledge. Here’s what you should know about hard water:

What is hard water?

High in minerals like calcium and magnesium, hard water is common across the United States. In fact, maps from Marmon Water reveal that 85 percent of Americans have hard water in their homes. The severity depends on location, with Indianapolis, Las Vegas, Minneapolis, Phoenix, San Antonio and Tampa among the metro areas with the highest levels of minerals in hard water. By contrast, New England, Hawaii and the Pacific Northwest tend to have the softest water.

What are the signs of hard water?

While hard water is safe to drink, bathe or for washing, it can easily stain sinks, tubs, dishes and clothes. It can also lead to higher water bills by making appliances work double time, according to Whirlpool.

After bathing in hard water, you may experience dry skin and flat hair caused by the harsh mineral deposits. Over time, soap scum and mineral deposits will build up around the tub and fixtures, and you may notice water heater problems. Beyond the bathtub, the most common indicators of hot water include white spots on dishes, laundered clothes that are dull in color and rough to the touch, clogged pipes and struggling appliances.

If you notice these signs, you can confirm your hunch by contacting your municipality if you have city water. Alternatively, you can purchase a water hardness test kit.

Is there hard water remedies?

Installing a water softener is the best way to combat the problems associated with hard water. As far as quick fixes go, you can choose cleaning and bathing products designed for homes with hard water. To remove hard water stains, Family Handyman suggests using cleaners that work against soap scum. Spray the cleaner on the tub and shower walls, letting it sit for at least five minutes before scrubbing. There are also several DIY hard water treatments you can try.

See how plans from Service Lines Warranties of America can help with the costs of home repairs.

How to Fix a Clogged Sewer Line

How to Fix a Clogged Sewer Line

There is no home maintenance issue that brings sheer frustration and disgust quicker than a clogged sewer or septic line. Take it from me (and my personal experience,) this inconvenience can take your day from very bad to worse in just minutes.

On the bright side, some plumbing issues can be dealt with on your own using some ingenuity and elbow grease. Let’s take a look at the big warning signs and how to go about addressing them:

The slow-moving drains

As explained by SFGate Home Guides, there is no sign of a clogged sewer line more obvious than drains that are moving slowly: Kitchen and bathroom sinks (and toilets) will either take forever and a day to drain or, in extreme cases, become blocked up entirely.

Small clogs in the kitchen drain may merely be due to a particularly recalcitrant buildup of food waste (a problem even more common to sinks without garbage disposals). Toilet draining issues, meanwhile, might just be a clump of toilet paper or other material that needs to be plunged or expunged with an appropriate cleaning product. If you try either of those and don’t succeed, you’ll probably need a plumber. Also, if multiple drains are simultaneously clogged, that’s an immediate sign of a big problem.

The dark water

If you see black or brown water emerging from any of the drains in your house, this is a surefire sign of a clogged sewer line.

What’s more, it’ll usually be accompanied by a wretched odor of raw sewage. More often than not, a sewer-line clog that produces dark water is one that will necessitate professional attention – especially, as The Spruce notes, if the filth is coming out of the drain in your tub.

The gurgling

This refers to the sound the toilet suddenly makes when water is traveling through other drains, like those in the kitchen or bathroom sinks, according to The Spruce. (It can affect other plumbing fixtures but only the toilet uses enough water to make the loud version of this sound.) It’s another major sign that the problem facing the drain extends to everywhere in the house, and is likely something major like overgrown tree roots causing damage to sewage pipes.

See how plans from Service Lines Warranties of America can help with the costs of home repairs.

Plumbing Repair Cost Guide

Plumbing Repair Cost Guide

Plumbing problems are the bane of my existence. Not only are they a major inconvenience, but repairs can be costly, especially if the plumbing issue goes unnoticed.

I’ll be the first to admit that beyond pulling the occasional hair clog that looks like “Cousin It” from the shower drain, I trust a plumbing professional for all my repair needs. Now that I’m aware of the signs when it’s time to call in the experts for my plumbing woes, you can learn what some of the most common and major repairs can cost as well.

Leaky plumbing fixtures

Drip. Drip. Drip. In the rare times my home is quiet, my ears instantly perk up when I hear the sound of dripping water. Not only is it mildly annoying, but a leaky faucet or shower head can actually be a major addition to your monthly water bill.

If you have your own tools, fixing a leaky faucet is actually relatively simple. Follow these easy steps and all you’ll be paying for is the cost of the materials or cleaning supplies needed. If you do hire a plumber, Thumbtack estimates it will cost between $65 and $150, depending on the severity of the problem and potential cause of the leak.

Garbage disposal problems

The garbage disposal is one of my most utilized appliances (bye-bye smelly food scraps!). But when it starts to leak or drainage is slow, it seriously messes with my dinner clean-up routine. You can easily troubleshoot many common problems with some DIY remedies or a trip to the hardware store. But if those don’t work, call in a plumber for a similar rate to fixing a leaky faucet.

Keep in mind some new garbage disposals cost as little as $80, so it might even be worth it to get a newer, more efficient model installed.

Damaged pipes

Are you noticing a faint smell of mildew, is your water bill suddenly high for seemingly no reason or are you finding water pooled around some of your appliances? All of these are signs there may be a leak in your water line – and it’s time to call a plumber.

While you might be able to find a leak on your own, you should rely on a professional plumber to do the job, since the severity of the leak and subsequent water damage can vary depending on the issue.

According to Fixr, the source of a problem with your water pipes could range from a leaky valve that may cost as little as $400 to replace, to a crack that could set you back upwards of $1,000 to solder. Sometimes, sections in your plumbing system need to be completely replaced by a plumbing contractor. The cost to install new piping is usually between $2,000 and $4,000 depending on materials, location and length.

Blocked pipe

A blocked drain in the kitchen sink is pretty gross, but there are plenty of ways to fix it yourself. A blocked pipe, on the other hand, is a different beast entirely. If you’re noticing a change in your water pressure or not-so-pleasant smells lingering, a blocked sewage or main pipe might be the culprit.

This requires professional plumbing services to come in with specialized equipment to try to eliminate the blockage. The Spruce found that the average cost to unclog a branch line within a home is around $390.

Hot water heater problems

Finding your showers cut short due to a lack of hot water? Seeing discolored water? Chances are your water heater is not working properly.

Hiring a plumber is the smart move to get your hot water heater repaired as soon as possible. For common problems, Homewyse found you can expect to pay around $200, but costs can dramatically increase in some cases.

Septic tank issues

What’s that smell? As unpleasant as it is, disagreeable odors coming from your bathroom, drains and even your yard might be sign something is seriously wrong with your septic tank and plumbing. A lot of small problems, like multiple clogged drains and gurgling noises coming from your pipes may mean there’s a larger issue happening underground.

Don’t hesitate to call in a professional for this job, but be prepared to pay upwards of $1,500 to repair this essential home system, according to A-American Septic. If you need an entirely new system, expect to pay about double that amount.

Hour by hour

Plumbing costs are no doubt expensive. As Fixr points out, most plumbers charge hourly rates between $45 and $150, depending on the size of the job (and where you live), and some will charge a flat fee between $50 and $100 for service calls.

See how plans from Service Lines Warranties of America can help with the costs of home repairs.

What Is the Cost to Install a Water Heater?

What Is the Cost to Install a Water Heater?

A few months ago, I wrote about my water heater mishap. (I know I’ll never forget that feeling of a freezing cold shower). I’m glad to report that my new water heater is still providing our family with hot showers and clean laundry – but I’m always on the lookout for the signs it might need maintenance.

During the frigid winter months, it’s more important than ever to check in on your water heater. If you do catch a problem early on, or realize you need an entirely new system, you can be proactive in receiving repairs (and won’t be caught in a mid-shower frozen surprise).

From my experience, I learned that installing a water heater is half the battle – and the majority of the cost – of purchasing this essential system. Don’t settle for lukewarm showers and half-washed dishes. Here’s everything you need to know about the cost to install a water heater.

The tank vs. tankless debate

The fact of the matter is, installation costs depend on the type of water heater you need or already have. Home Depot breaks down two of the most popular choices for homeowners:

  • Traditional water heaters: Typically store between 20 and 80 gallons of water heated by gas or electric power. The average total cost for a new traditional water heater and installation is $1,308.

  • Tankless water heaters: Gaining popularity in recent years, these units are also fueled by gas or electricity but only heat water as needed. They’re accepted as being more environmentally friendly, though they come with higher upfront costs. The average total cost for a tankless water heater is around $3,000.

Total costs include everything from the unit itself, permits, materials, installation, labor costs and removal of the old unit. Thumbtack.com estimates the national average cost of installing a water heater ranges from $500 to $1,000.

What’s your fuel source?

Water heater installation costs aren’t just affected by the type of water heater chosen, but also by the fuel sources available. Both traditional and tankless heaters can use gas or electricity to warm up water. A gas water heater may cost $50-100 more to install than an electric tank water heater. Likewise, you can expect to pay $500 more for a gas tankless water heater than an electric water heater.

If you need – or want – to switch fuel sources, you’ll most likely need to add some room to your budget. Going from an electric to gas water heater may require the addition of a gas line, that usually costs $500 to install, reports Homewyse.com.

Other factors to consider

The size, model, home layout and any additional – necessary – work can all contribute to the costs associated with installing a water heater. Traditional water heaters may require expansion tanks to minimize the risk of pressure damage to the plumbing system. TheSpruce.com explains this is mostly needed in closed water supply systems, so always factor that into your water heater costs.

While tankless heaters come with higher upfront costs, they can require less maintenance in the long run and families can see energy costs decrease because water is heated on a need-only basis. Both kinds of water heaters have energy-efficient models available for more cost savings.

Though each system comes with its own unique costs, installation can also vary based on your needs and wants. Always make sure to do your research before deciding on the best water heater for your home and have a licensed professional install it.

See how plans from Service Lines Warranties of America can help with the costs of home repairs.

How to Install a Kitchen Faucet

How to Install a Kitchen Faucet

So it turns out, I’m not as handy as I thought. After binge-watching a ton of home renovation shows, I got cocky and decided to take a crack at replacing my kitchen faucet on my own. (I mean how hard could it be?)

n theory, it all seemed super straightforward. But in practice? Nope! (After lying on my back and fumbling around in a pitch-black cabinet for the better part of a Saturday afternoon, I realized that I have my limits!) I had to call in my dad to come and bail me out.

The lesson learned is that 99% of most people I meet are handier at home repairs than I am. But since I spent so much time researching on how to install a kitchen faucet, I thought I’d share my findings. Here you go:

Purchase a compatible faucet

Before you set your heart on a sleek new faucet style, make sure it’s compatible with your sink.

Peek underneath to see how many holes there are. If there’s just one, you’ll need a one-hole faucet. But you have more options if there are three or four holes in your sink.

As for the style, copper, brass and brushed gold are popular, but pewter and gunmetal finishes can add darker drama. For functionality, consider a motion-sensing touchless faucet.

Under-sink prep

Clear out everything in the storage cabinet under your sink and keep a work light, bucket and towels on hand.

Since you’ll be laying on your back, set down a small ramp of plywood and an old pillow for comfort.

Shut off the water

Before taking anything apart, remember to turn off the water! If your kitchen sink has a garbage disposal or an electrical outlet underneath, turn off the power, too.

Locate the valves under your sink or, if there aren’t any, head to the main water supply line. Switch the shutoff valve to the “off” setting. If it won’t budge, try coaxing it with heat from a hairdryer or gently twisting it with pliers.

Then, switch on the faucet to relieve any pressure in the water lines.

Remove the old faucet

To get the old faucet out of the way, loosen all of the mounting hardware and disconnect all of the supply lines from below. It helps to have someone else keeps the faucet still from above, and a bucket or towel to catch the dripping water below.

Depending on the type of faucet in your sink, you may need to use different strategies, but a basin wrench will always come in handy for loosening the nuts.

Install the new faucet

Follow the manufacturer’s instructions as closely as possible for the most successful installation.

Depending on the type of spout assembly you’re working with, you may need to hook up the main faucet, separate hot and cold supply lines and a side sprayer hose.

But, in general, you’ll slide the pieces in from above and use a basin wrench to tighten the mounting hardware. You might also need to use caulk or plumber’s putty to seal up the gaps.

Once everything is secure, connect the water supply lines to complete the plumbing connection.

Test the faucet

Turn the water back on at the supply valves and run a gentle stream of water to make sure it works. Check for drips around the supply lines and tighten the hardware if necessary.

Once you’ve tested it out and everything appears to be dry, remove the faucet’s aerator. Run the water at full-blast to flush out any debris that may have collected. Replace the aerator and your new kitchen sink is ready to go!

After installing or replacing a kitchen faucet, you’ll want to keep all your home systems running smoothly.

FinSee how plans from Service Lines Warranties of America can help with the costs of home repairs.

How to Thaw Frozen Pipes

How to Thaw Frozen Pipes

Even with the best laid plans to winterize your home plumbing system, sometimes pipes still freeze over. And sometimes, they burst. And then the panic builds and causes the emotions to burst. (Sound familiar?)

As my science-loving daughter explained to me, it has to do with changing states of matter. (Yep, she’s a smarty pants.) As the frozen water expands, the pressure can build from 40 PSI to 40,000 PSI. Ordinary pipes are no match for this explosive stress and they’ll rupture.

The worst-case scenario

You may not notice you have a burst pipe until it starts thawing. Then, water will start flooding straight into your home at a rate of hundreds of gallons per hour, according to The Spruce. A wintertime flood can only ever lead to extensive water damage, costly home repairs and buckets of bitter tears.

Identifying a frozen pipe

The most vulnerable pipes are those in an unheated crawl space, basement or garage, and those within external walls. This includes pipes in closets and cabinets and those near outdoor hose hookups. Exposed pipes are also susceptible. Basically, any pipe with some proximity to the great frozen tundra of the outside world is at risk of freezing.

If you can successfully thaw out your frozen pipe before it bursts, you’ll save yourself endless trouble and strife. When the temperatures drop, here are some signs to look for:

  • Nothing comes out of the tap when you turn it on.
  • The water pressure is significantly reduced.
  • Your toilet bowl doesn’t refill after you flush it.
  • Frost appears on the outside of the pipe.
  • There’s a bulge in the pipe.

If you notice one or more of these things, chances are your pipes are frozen and you need to take action — immediately.

What to do

Upon spotting a frozen pipe, keep the surrounding area as warm as possible. Turn up the thermostat to about 70 degrees. To help the heat circulate and stay in, leave cabinet doors open so the warmth reaches the plumbing system and keep your windows and garage door closed.

Direct a space heater (though always use safety precautions) or infrared lamp towards exposed pipes and those behind walls. You can also blow a hot hair dryer towards the pipes to speed up the thawing process. (But never, ever use an exposed flame.) If the situation is really dire, consider slicing out a section of drywall to expose the pipe.

Focus your efforts on the part of the pipe closest to the faucet so that the melting water has somewhere to go. Keep a stream of cold water flowing out of the faucet. If the pipes are frozen, the water flow will be noticeably reduced. As they thaw out, you’ll notice the flow pick up.

If you expect the cold snap to pass, you may be able to resolve the problem on your own. However, if the weather forecast shows that Jack Frost is going to stick around like an unwanted guest, you’d be best served by enlisting the help of an experienced plumber.

Long-term solutions

The crisis may be averted, but you should still take preventative measures with these habits and home improvements to make sure your pipes don’t freeze again:

  • Cover the pipes with pipe insulation.
  • Insulate vulnerable rooms like the basement and crawl spaces.
  • Keep your thermostat at 70 degrees Fahrenheit during the colder months.
  • Consider having electric heat cables installed.

Being prepared for pipe and plumbing emergencies is always a good idea. See how plans from Service Lines Warranties of America can help with the costs of home repairs.

Thanksgiving Leftover Recipes Better Than the Holiday Meal

Thanksgiving Leftover Recipes Better Than the Holiday Meal

Remember that episode from Season 5 of “Friends” entitled “The One With Ross’ Sandwich” where Ross has an actual breakdown after someone steals his Thanksgiving leftovers? (One of my all time faves!)

Apparently, Ross had been looking forward to that Thanksgiving sandwich all year long – ‘cause it’s just that good.

While you binge on Netflix after the parade and pumpkin pie, wondering what to do with all those Thanksgiving leftovers, why not bookmark a few of my favorite post-Thanksgiving recipes?

My kids say these are better than Thursday’s turkey and stuffing — but I’ll leave it to you and yours to decide.

Breakfast

Try these low-carb stuffing waffles with a dollop of cranberry sauce. Or start your morning with Thanks Benedict, featuring stuffing cakes smothered in a sage hollandaise sauce, by one of my favorite chefs, Giada de Laurentiis.

For a weekend brunch with friends (and mimosas), I love making a sweet potato and kale frittata with creamy goat cheese, or this stuffing and turkey quiche.

The kids will adore breakfast sausage and stuffing bites — they’re so good you’ll want to pop a few before heading out for the Black Friday doorbusters.

Get a plan from Service Lines Warranties of America today

Soups and sandwiches

My favorite turkey soup is a creamy, one-pot recipe for turkey and dumplings. It’s a great way to use up whatever turkey meat and veggies you have left.

I also recommend this hearty leftover turkey chili recipe. With a bowl filled with leftover goodness plus edamame and a homemade spice mix, it’s a great way to help your taste buds (and waist line) transition out of the holiday weekend.

And, while you can easily throw together a turkey sandwich to relive the flavors of Thanksgiving Day, why not take it up a notch with a gooey brie, apple and cranberry grilled cheese sandwich? Simple but oh-so indulgent.

Savory pies

If you’re in the mood for comfort food, don’t miss this Thanksgiving shepherd’s pie. Or, remix the same festive flavors into a turkey pie with a cornbread stuffing crust.

I also can’t speak highly enough of Paul Hollywood’s ham and turkey pot pie. As seen on the Great British Baking Show holiday masterclass, it features a creamy sauce with leeks simmering beneath rough-puff pastry and looks as impressive as it tastes.

Get a plan from Service Lines Warranties of America today

For something quicker, pop these easy Thanksgiving leftover hand pies into the oven. They’re made with store-bought pie crust and the kids will enjoy crafting their own homemade hot pockets.

Pizza

Leftover pizzas are a serious crowd-pleaser! Layer up turkey and sides into a Thanksgiving pizza baked in puff pastry. This version is topped with fried onions for an extra crunch.

My kids always request this yummy mashed potato pizza with leeks and bacon crumbles, but I also like to make up another pizza with turkey, cranberries and barbeque sauce for the grown-ups.

Before you get busy using all your appliances in the kitchen, it’s a good idea to have an appliance home warranty plan in place – just in case there’s a breakdown. See how plans from Service Lines Warranties of America can help with the costs of home repairs.

6 Ways to Protect Your Home from Water Damage

home water damage

Did you know, water damage is more likely to occur in your home than fire damage? We protect our homes from catastrophes, but water damage could be just as dangerous.

Plumbing leaks are common anywhere there is running water, such as:

  • Toilets
  • Faucets/Sinks
  • Dishwashers
  • Ice makers
  • Water heaters
  • Tubs/showers
  • Washing machines
  • Internal pipes and hoses

Water damage isn’t only a problem financially; it can lead to serious health risks from chemicals, toxins and mold, such as rashes, asthma or other chronic health conditions. Additionally, recent studies have shown that children with prolonged exposure to water- damaged rooms in their home are at a higher risk of developing eczema.

Whether from a slow leak or flooded basement, there are things that a homeowner can do to mitigate or minimize the extent of water damage.

  • Check for leaks or cracks in hoses that run to the washing machine, dishwasher and refrigerator at least once a year and replace these hoses every five to seven years.
  • Be sure the caulking around tubs and showers is free of cracks.
  • Know where your water main is located and how to shut it off.
  • Install floor pans under appliances to prevent damage from slow, undetected leaks.
  • Use water leak alarms, which will alert you to a leak in basements, laundry rooms, bathrooms, kitchens and sump pumps.
  • Buy a water flow monitoring system, which attaches to your water main and, if flow that exceeds normal use is detected, will automatically shut off the flow of water into your home.

When the problem is from your water service line, that’s when repairs can really get costly. Service Line Warranties of America offers affordable warranties to help cover those repairs. Enter your zip code to learn more.

NLC City Summit 2016

NLC PittsburghIn November Utility Service Partners, Inc. (USP), program administrator for the National League of Cities (NLC) Service Line Warranty Program, was an exhibitor at the NLC City Summit in Pittsburgh, PA – our hometown! We had the opportunity to meet with city officials from across the nation. Many of our current partners also stopped by the booth to check in. Please check out all the great photos from the event on our Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/ServiceLineWarrantiesofAmerica.

Today, USP would like to thank all of our current partners, customers and contractors that make the Service Line Warranty Program a great success, as well as the many organizations we partner with on a local, state and national level. It is through your commitment to the program and valued partnership that we are able to provide warranty protection to homeowners across North America.

Thank you for your continued support.

Utility Service Partners